hussatan:

do you ever look at your url and think “i am so glad that i have this url. i deserve this url” 


pilferingapples:

angualupin:

laissezferre:

threadbaremillionaire:

Was it just me or were these lines cut from the current production? Someone with a better memory please reassure/confirm. Either way I felt like drawing it.

screeaaamss yes, the lyrics were cut back in 2000. combeferre used to sing his lines as he stopped the others from pointing their guns at javert, and grantaire was… somewhere

The score is also really interesting here:
The lines sung by Courfeyrac, Feuilly, and Bossuet, when threatening Javert (take the bastard now and shoot him/let us watch this devil dance/you would do the same Inspector/if we let you have your chance) are to a line of music that is elsewhere only seen in two places: it is usually sung by Javert when he is pronouncing judgment on other characters; for example, it is the tune to which I have heard such protestations/every day for twenty years/let’s have no more explanations/save your breath and save your tears is sung during Fantine’s Arrest. The only other time it is used is when Gavroche is mocking Javert. The musical cues, therefore, tell us that this action by the Amis (the desired shooting of Javert) is judgment and that is also wrong; the Amis are employing the same blind condemnation of others that makes Javert the villain.
In contrast, Combeferre’s response (though we may not all survive here/there are things that never die) is sung to the same tune as Fantine’s there’s a child that sorely needs me/please m’siuer she’s just that high, which tells us that Combeferre here is acting as the voice of compassion. It is, in essence, as much a plea for mercy as Fantine’s; more importantly, it’s a plea that must be headed if the moral rightness of the tale is to be followed. Javert, ignoring Fantine’s plea, was acting wrongly; the Amis, while they might have been wrong in their initial leap to take the bastard now and shoot him, respond to Combeferre’s plea in a way that Javert does not respond to Fantine’s, and thus, they ultimately choose the moral path. So by cutting this minute of run time, Cammack wasn’t only cutting a nice bit of Combeferre and Grantaire characterisation that Amis fans might miss, he was also cutting another lesson on judgement vs. mercy, which is ultimately the heart of the story.
(As for Grantaire’s following what’s the difference, die a policeman/die a schoolboy, die a spy, it’s harder for me to tell — I don’t have a copy of the original score, only the 2010 tour score, so I can’t do a bar-by-bar comparison — but I think it’s a unique line that is a play off the plea line but falls more emphatically, making it something like “a despairing plea”, which would fit for what Grantaire is trying to say. But I’d have to have the actual music in front of me to be sure.)
I’ve said it sixty-zillion times before and will say it again: the musical, with all its flaws (and they are many), is still the best adaptation that isn’t a 10+ hour miniseries not that that guarantees you’re a good adaptation, yes I’m looking at you Shoujo Cosette because you can communicate so much more in five minutes of song than you can in five minutes of dialogue. The kind of musical referencing seen here is just one example.
PS If you want to listen to the uncut version, see here, about 3:40 in. It’s the ‘99 London production, with JOJ as Valjean. The entire thing is worth a watch, and not only because it’s pre-cuts.

OH mY GOSH I’d been putting off reblogging this until I could properly address how great the art is but now there is also AMAZING COMMENTARY??
And the art is VERY good—-the words are bouncing off each other just right for the sort of juxtaposition they’re supposed to have, and I love the expressions, and the BACKGROUNDS! That one beam of light shining at Combeferre, how VERY Hugo, how excellent. XD.

pilferingapples:

angualupin:

laissezferre:

threadbaremillionaire:

Was it just me or were these lines cut from the current production? Someone with a better memory please reassure/confirm. Either way I felt like drawing it.

screeaaamss yes, the lyrics were cut back in 2000. combeferre used to sing his lines as he stopped the others from pointing their guns at javert, and grantaire was… somewhere

The score is also really interesting here:

The lines sung by Courfeyrac, Feuilly, and Bossuet, when threatening Javert (take the bastard now and shoot him/let us watch this devil dance/you would do the same Inspector/if we let you have your chance) are to a line of music that is elsewhere only seen in two places: it is usually sung by Javert when he is pronouncing judgment on other characters; for example, it is the tune to which I have heard such protestations/every day for twenty years/let’s have no more explanations/save your breath and save your tears is sung during Fantine’s Arrest. The only other time it is used is when Gavroche is mocking Javert. The musical cues, therefore, tell us that this action by the Amis (the desired shooting of Javert) is judgment and that is also wrong; the Amis are employing the same blind condemnation of others that makes Javert the villain.

In contrast, Combeferre’s response (though we may not all survive here/there are things that never die) is sung to the same tune as Fantine’s there’s a child that sorely needs me/please m’siuer she’s just that high, which tells us that Combeferre here is acting as the voice of compassion. It is, in essence, as much a plea for mercy as Fantine’s; more importantly, it’s a plea that must be headed if the moral rightness of the tale is to be followed. Javert, ignoring Fantine’s plea, was acting wrongly; the Amis, while they might have been wrong in their initial leap to take the bastard now and shoot him, respond to Combeferre’s plea in a way that Javert does not respond to Fantine’s, and thus, they ultimately choose the moral path. So by cutting this minute of run time, Cammack wasn’t only cutting a nice bit of Combeferre and Grantaire characterisation that Amis fans might miss, he was also cutting another lesson on judgement vs. mercy, which is ultimately the heart of the story.

(As for Grantaire’s following what’s the difference, die a policeman/die a schoolboy, die a spy, it’s harder for me to tell — I don’t have a copy of the original score, only the 2010 tour score, so I can’t do a bar-by-bar comparison — but I think it’s a unique line that is a play off the plea line but falls more emphatically, making it something like “a despairing plea”, which would fit for what Grantaire is trying to say. But I’d have to have the actual music in front of me to be sure.)

I’ve said it sixty-zillion times before and will say it again: the musical, with all its flaws (and they are many), is still the best adaptation that isn’t a 10+ hour miniseries not that that guarantees you’re a good adaptation, yes I’m looking at you Shoujo Cosette because you can communicate so much more in five minutes of song than you can in five minutes of dialogue. The kind of musical referencing seen here is just one example.

PS If you want to listen to the uncut version, see here, about 3:40 in. It’s the ‘99 London production, with JOJ as Valjean. The entire thing is worth a watch, and not only because it’s pre-cuts.

OH mY GOSH I’d been putting off reblogging this until I could properly address how great the art is but now there is also AMAZING COMMENTARY??

And the art is VERY good—-the words are bouncing off each other just right for the sort of juxtaposition they’re supposed to have, and I love the expressions, and the BACKGROUNDS! That one beam of light shining at Combeferre, how VERY Hugo, how excellent. XD.


kerrschtein:

megg33k:

thegoofyvz:

idea by captainjoss

HURTS ME IN ALL THE WAYS

oh all the feels….


athelstanning:

literature meme - prose [1/10] - les misérables by victor hugo

Citizens, the nineteenth century has been great, but the twentieth century will be happy.


theodddaysout:

Andrew is ashamed of me but I TOLD THE TRUTH AND THEREFORE I CANNOT BE CRITICIZED. 

please don’t kill me. 


get to know me meme1/5 favorite female characters: ELLE WOODS 
"If I’m going to be a partner in a law firm, I’m going to need a boyfriend who’s not such a bonehead."



highfunctioningsociocat:

god-tieraradia:

hashtaghomicide:

what cats?!

wildteam!

GET YOUR GAME IN THE HEAD


This city needs me…

make me choose
↳ 
anonymous asked: elves of dwarves


Avenue Q (2003-2009)


merlinsassbutt:

tfios-changed-my-life:

So this little cigarette right here has sparked a whole new brand of TFiOS hate, much of which is coming from people who claimed to love the book. 
Many people are now pointing out how “pretentious” Augustus is, and I can’t help but think, You’re only just now realizing this. He was written to be a seemingly pretentious and arrogant person. The acknowledgement of this is actually highly important because, without it, the book loses the message that a hero’s journey is that of strength to weakness. 
Augustus Waters has big dreams for himself. He wants to be known and remembered; he wants to be a hero; he wants to be seen as perfect. But there’s already something standing in his way… He has a disability, and society tells him that a person cannot be both perfect and disabled. So what does he do? He creates a persona for himself. He tries to appear older and wiser than he is. But the pretentious side of him is NOT who he truly is. It’s all an act. (This is evident in the fact that he often uses words in the wrong context.)
And when his cancer returns, we begin to see his mask cracking. The true Augustus begins to bleed through… Hazel even takes notice of this from time to time. And by the time we get to the gas station scene, Augustus is no longer the picture of perfection he was when we met him. The play has been canceled. The actor must reveal himself. And he’s revealed to be a weak, defenseless boy, succumbing to the cancer that is made of him. 
THE PRETENTIOUSNESS IS INTENTIONAL. It stands to show Augustus’s journey from flawless to flawed, from strong to weak. It’s the key to understanding that Augustus was the hero he always wanted to be, even if he didn’t realized it. 

As Hazel says in one of my favorite quotes, “When surprised and exited and innocent Gus emerged from Grand Gesture Metaphorically Inclined Augustus, I literally could not resist”

merlinsassbutt:

tfios-changed-my-life:

So this little cigarette right here has sparked a whole new brand of TFiOS hate, much of which is coming from people who claimed to love the book. 

Many people are now pointing out how “pretentious” Augustus is, and I can’t help but think, You’re only just now realizing this. He was written to be a seemingly pretentious and arrogant person. The acknowledgement of this is actually highly important because, without it, the book loses the message that a hero’s journey is that of strength to weakness

Augustus Waters has big dreams for himself. He wants to be known and remembered; he wants to be a hero; he wants to be seen as perfect. But there’s already something standing in his way… He has a disability, and society tells him that a person cannot be both perfect and disabled. So what does he do? He creates a persona for himself. He tries to appear older and wiser than he is. But the pretentious side of him is NOT who he truly is. It’s all an act. (This is evident in the fact that he often uses words in the wrong context.)

And when his cancer returns, we begin to see his mask cracking. The true Augustus begins to bleed through… Hazel even takes notice of this from time to time. And by the time we get to the gas station scene, Augustus is no longer the picture of perfection he was when we met him. The play has been canceled. The actor must reveal himself. And he’s revealed to be a weak, defenseless boy, succumbing to the cancer that is made of him. 

THE PRETENTIOUSNESS IS INTENTIONAL. It stands to show Augustus’s journey from flawless to flawed, from strong to weak. It’s the key to understanding that Augustus was the hero he always wanted to be, even if he didn’t realized it. 

As Hazel says in one of my favorite quotes, “When surprised and exited and innocent Gus emerged from Grand Gesture Metaphorically Inclined Augustus, I literally could not resist”


martininamerica:

lonely-ler:

thiscartoonlife:

Witty banter

I HAVE BEEN WAITING FOR THIS GIF SET FOR THE LONGEST TIME!

Give me a sequel to this.


@ChloeBennet4:  clarkgregg imbrettdalton